Apr 10, 2014

Bomber Pattern-in-Progress

I'm not saying you have to be a math wizard to be a good patternmaker, but it definitely helps to have the kind of mind that can solve visual problems. Exhibit A: here's what my patternmaking textbook (The Art and Science of Patternmaking and Grading by Professor Harry Greenberg & Professor Leonard Trattner ) indicates needs to be done to create a proper raglan sleeve pattern:

Fun, right?
Doing so creates the necessary ease under the arm, so you can do things like scratch your nose and wave to your friends. Now here's what that looked like in real life on my living room floor the other night:


Of course, then I taped it all down to a large piece of paper and used my curves and rulers to draw all around the now-cut-up sleeve pattern. Then I double-checked and fiddled until all the seams were the right lengths.

The end result? Pretty perfect really!



Now the back view:

I wanted to check welt placement (and let's face it, who couldn't use a little practice making welt pockets?), so I cut and sewed just one:


There you have it, kids: Math=a good fit! Now I just need to choose my lining fabric and I'm all set to sew a bomber jacket from my own pattern.  Anyone have a fave welt pocket tutorial they want to share? Throw it down in the comments below.

14 comments:

  1. Funny that is exactly what we learning in my patternmaking class on Tuesday. And your bomber looks amazing. Like you should sell that pattern amazing.

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    1. I would if I knew how to grade and transfer my patterns into digital form. I have no idea how to recreate a pattern in Illustrator or whatever it is you use to create a downloadable PDF. So many skills needed to make the move into selling your creative work!

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    2. I'm not proficient with computers, so I did what I call my "old-person" solution when I've made PDFs because it is clearly a mechanical solution to a digital problem that I don't want to learn. I draw out the pieces on a sheet of big paper, then I take 8.5x11 printer paper and tape those together into a sheet the same size. Then I trace them on to the 8.5x11 thing and untape it. I scan the individual papers and my computer turns them into a PDF automatically.

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  3. i think it looks great. you are right, the fit and ease look perfect. and i have welt-pocket envy.

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    1. sure...but don't look too closely! I wasn't too worried about getting my welt just right on this muslin...so on the inside it's a bit of a mess

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  4. This looks awesome!!! So excited for more progress info! We're currently building a 9' long desk for the "sewing room" (also the office, guest room, and shared work area for my better half), but I'm itching to make a grainline Moss. I think that's next. Maybe I'll even post. HAH!

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  5. Simply, wow! I do have a sloper (bodice), may be I can draft a bomber jacket too? This is pretty awesome and it's just your muslin. Amazing!

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  6. This looks awesome! The fit is perfect!

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  7. oh wow, thanks for sharing this! the jacket looks pretty great from here, can't wait to see it!

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  8. Kathleen Fasenella has released a bomber pattern and sells her instructions separately. I bet they are the best bomber jacket instructions available anywhere. https://www.etsy.com/shop/Savantpatterns?ref=pr_shop_more

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    1. That's so interesting. Thanks for sharing!

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